SUPPORTING AND PROMOTING
MAINE'S COLLECTING INSTITUTIONS

Events at Member Institutions

Umbrella Cover Museum, Peaks Island Curran Homestead and Living History Museum, Orrington Curran Homestead and Living History Museum, Orrington Hamilton House, South Berwick Union Historical Society 

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  • 19 Aug 2016 8:30 AM | Anonymous member

    Between 1944 and 1946, more than 4,000 German prisoners of war called Maine home. The story of how they arrived, and the lasting impact that they had on the people who encountered them is one of Maine’s most interesting and obscure stories.  Using materials and research used to create the 2012 exhibit “Maine Boys Overseas and German Boys in Maine,” Holocaust and Human Rights Center of Maine Program Director David Greenham shares the lively and surprising story of an interesting chapter of Maine history.  It is a story of cooperation, kindness, and enemies who became colleagues, and even friends. 

    David Greenham is an adjunct professor of Drama at the University of Maine at Augusta, works as a grant writer and Program Manager for the Holocaust and Human Rights Center of Maine (HHRC).  He spent 14 years as the Producing Artistic Director of The Theater At Monmouth, and has been a theater artist and arts administrator for more than 25 years.  In 2013, David was the creator and performer of Maine at Work, a touring program commissioned by the Maine Humanities Council. He has also been seen as a performer with Everyman Repertory Theater, Bath Shakespeare Festival, Camden Shakespeare Festival, and Capitol City Improv in Augusta.  In 2013, David created the exhibit Maine Boys Overseas, and German Boys in Maine for the HHRC.  The exhibit and the research to create it was the inspiration for the POW Camps in Maine program that has been presented for several community groups in Maine.  He continues to research the project with the goal of writing a book about the topic in partnership with several historians.

    The Kennebec Historical Society and the Maine State Library’s Public Presentation will take place on Wednesday, August 24, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. at the Maine State Library, 230 State Street in Augusta.  This is an encore presentation of the Kennebec Historical Society’s July Public Presentation and refreshments will be served.


  • 15 Aug 2016 9:04 AM | Anonymous member

    Florence Brooks Whitehouse was a Maine suffrage leader from 1914 – 1920. Her support of “radical” tactics, such as picketing President Wilson, earned condemnation from her more conservative suffrage peers in Maine.  As a result, she was left out of suffrage histories, although the record plainly shows that she did more than almost anyone in the closing years of the campaign to bring woman suffrage to the state. Through a statewide suffrage referendum, WWI, the 1918 influenza pandemic, and the political machinations of men of both major political parties, Florence and her peers fought for women’s right to vote and to have equality of opportunity with men. This is a story that has really never been told in Maine.

    Anne Gass, our August speaker and great-grand-daughter of Whitehouse, has written Voting Down the Rose: Florence Brooks Whitehouse and Maine’s Fight for Woman Suffrage, which is a lively account of Florence’s suffrage activities during the critical final years of the campaign.  Due to the wealth of correspondence, interviews, and other historical documents Gass found in her research, Florence is often able to speak for herself in the pages.  William Barry, who reviewed the book for the Portland Press Herald, wrote “The author, Whitehouse’s great-grand-daughter, is never sentimental, for this is a true work of scholarship. Gass depicts not only the work of one Maine suffragist, but also the clash between the Maine Woman Suffrage Association, founded in 1874, and the radical National Woman’s Party of 1916.”


    The Kennebec Historical Society August Presentation is free to the public (donations gladly accepted) and will take place on Wednesday, August 17, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. at the Augusta City Center, located at 16 Cony Street in Augusta.​  


  • 13 Aug 2016 10:00 AM | Anonymous member

    The Tate House Museum is honored to host the premier book signing for RonRomano’s upcoming release, “Early Gravestones in Southern Maine: The Genius of Bartlett Adams” on Saturday, August 13. In addition, Mr. Romano will be leading tours of the historic and picturesque Stroudwater Burying Ground, which contains gravestones that are the work of Bartlett Adams.

    The slate gravestones of southern Maine bear evidence to the region's fascinating history, from shipwrecks and famous wartime sea captains to countless ordinary citizens. Master stone-cutter Bartlett Adams memorialized the tragedy and triumph of the region in nearly 2,000 gravestones. The book examines the artistry of the headstones that mark the resting places of three generations of the same family who all went down with the schooner Charles, and reveals the grief that Adams poured into the stones for his own three children. Through deep and original research, author and guide Ron Romano narrates the early history of southern Maine and one man's legacy, carved in stone.


    A native of Portland, Ron Romano leads the cemetery walking tours program for Spirits Alive, the Friends of Eastern Cemetery. He is active in stone conservation and enjoys researching "subterranean residents" and gravestones. He has found 1,750 gravestones at 133 Maine cemeteries that were produced in the Bartlett Adams stone-cutting shop between 1800 and 1828. Ron has presented his original research on the life and work of Adams locally and nationally at a series of well-received lectures.


    Book signings and cemetery tour sessions will be conducted at 10:00AM, noon, and 2:00PM. The cost of the tour is $10, or FREE with the purchase of the book. Combination tours including the Tate House will also be available.


    For More Information Contact:

    Betty Janus

    Tate House Museum

    1267 Westbrook Street

    Portland, Maine

    207-774-6177

    www.tatehouse.org


  • 09 Aug 2016 6:30 PM | Anonymous member
      On August 9th at 6:30PM the Tate House Museum will be presenting a lecture and workshop with Beth Maitland on the art of English Paper Piecing. For those interested in quilting or fabric artistry this is a time-honored technique dating back to the first quarter of the 18th century. It’s a wonderfully simple method for constructing intricate quilts with lots of perfectly matched points. It’s completely done by hand and can be assembled in modular units so you can take it with you.

    Beth is a member of the Pine Tree Quilters Guild and an award winning teacher of quilting. Her series of workshops, lectures, and demonstrations aredesigned to focus on creativity and individual design. Her light-hearted and engaging approach allows quilters of all levels to actively utilize their innate creativity.

    This lecture is part of the Tate House Museum Summer Lecture Series. Reservations are suggested by calling 774-6177 or emailing info@tatehouse.org. Tickets are $12 ($10 for members).


    Contact:

    Betty Janus

    Tate House Museum

    1267 Westbrook Street

    Portland ME 04102

  • 30 Jul 2016 11:30 AM | Anonymous member

    Stroudwaters historic Tate House Museum is hosting an 18th centuryColonial Frolic at the spectacular Spurwink Farm, located at 50 Fieldways Lane in Cape Elizabeth on July 30th, from 11:30AM to 4:00PM. (Rain date is July 31st.)

    The Frolic is offering an array of colonial games, races and puppets as well as music and other family activities. Historic tours to a private 18th century cemetery on the grounds are also scheduled. Food trucks will be providing hot dogs, hamburgers and desserts. Water is being donated by the Portland Water District. Families are encouraged to bring blankets,umbrellas and hats and enjoy beautiful sweeping views of the Spurwink River and the ocean.

    This is a unique opportunity for families, through outdoor activities, to becomemore acquainted with the significance of the Tate House to Maine history and also learn about issues of local importance, said the Museum Board President, Ralph Carmona. “Conservationists and preservationists Phin and Mary Lou Sprague cordially invite you to enjoy a day at their farm.It’s a rare opportunity.”

    The Spurwink Farm can be reached by following Route 77 south pastCrescent Beach (or north past Higgins Beach) to Charles Jordan Road; then, just follow the signs to 50 Fieldways Lane.

    Admission to the Frolic is $10 per car ($15 at the gate) and $5 for bikes. Pre-purchasing tickets is strongly recommended as space is limited.Tickets can be purchased at Cape Elizabeth Community Services,343 Ocean House Road (between 8AM-4:30PM Mondays through Fridays);Pond Cove IGA339 Ocean House Road (between 7:30-8PM Mondays to Saturday, and 8-6PM on Sundays) or the Tate House Museum1267 Westbrook Street, Portland, 10AM-4PM between Tuesdays and Fridays.

    FMI: contact the Tate House Museum at 207-774-6177 or e-mailing info@tatehouse.org. The museum website is tatehouse.org.






  • 26 Jul 2016 6:30 PM | Anonymous member

    Hawaiian appliqué and quilting reflect the beauty of Hawaii’s tropical and colorful environment. Exotic flowers and wildlife inspire unique and often abstract designs of bright colors on contrasting backgrounds.

    Quilting techniques used by Hawaiian women were adapted from early New England methods. At that time missionaries and their wives traveled to the Hawaiian Islands. Local girls were taught sewing and quilt making, or ‘piecing’ as it was called.

    Tate House Education Committee member Diane Hoppe will present an illustrated demonstration of the history, influences, and art of Hawaiian quilting. This presentation & demonstration will include instructions and materials to begin your own discovery of the beauty of Hawaiian Quilting. Space is limited, so please contact the museum to reserve your space. Telephone 774-6177 or email at info@tatehouse.org

    $12 ($10 members)

  • 20 Jul 2016 6:30 PM | Anonymous member

    The Kennebec Historical Society’s July Public Presentation:  “Maine’s German POW Camps in World War II”

    Between 1944 and 1946, more than 4,000 German prisoners of war called Maine home. The story of how they arrived, and the lasting impact that they had on the people who encountered them is one of Maine’s most interesting and obscure stories.  Using materials and research used to create the 2012 exhibit “Maine Boys Overseas and German Boys in Maine,” Holocaust and Human Rights Center of Maine Program Director David Greenham shares the lively and surprising story of an interesting chapter of Maine history.  It is a story of cooperation, kindness, and enemies who became colleagues, and even friends. 

    David Greenham is an adjunct professor of Drama at the University of Maine at Augusta, works as a grant writer and Program Manager for the Holocaust and Human Rights Center of Maine (HHRC).  He spent 14 years as the Producing Artistic Director of The Theater At Monmouth, and has been a theater artist and arts administrator for more than 25 years.  In 2013, David was the creator and performer of Maine at Work, a touring program commissioned by the Maine Humanities Council. He has also been seen as a performer with Everyman Repertory Theater, Bath Shakespeare Festival, Camden Shakespeare Festival, and Capitol City Improv in Augusta.  In 2013, David created the exhibit Maine Boys Overseas, and German Boys in Maine for the HHRC.  The exhibit and the research to create it was the inspiration for the POW Camps in Maine program that has been presented for several community groups in Maine.  He continues to research the project with the goal of writing a book about the topic in partnership with several historians.

    The Kennebec Historical Society July Public Presentation will take place on Wednesday, July 20, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. at the Michael Klahr Center at the University of Maine at Augusta, 46 University Drive in Augusta.

  • 12 Jul 2016 6:30 PM | Anonymous member
    On July 12that 6:30PM the Tate House Museum will host a lecture by Anne Perkins on the 18thcentury garden in the Stroudwater garden of the Tates. Mrs. Perkins will talk about the major design elements of grand 18thcentury gardens, the influence of Enlightenment thought on garden design of the period and the ideal of the “decorated farm” which informed much of the garden/estate design of the time.As co-chair of the Landscape Committee at the General Henry Knox Museum in Thomaston Anne Perkins has studied much of the literature regarding 18thand 19thcentury garden design in England, France and North America and has traveled extensively, visiting historic homes and gardens here in United States.As a professional vegetable, culinary herb, fruit and cut flower grower she farms at Headacre Farm in Owls Head as well as at her historic home in Thomaston. She sells her produce to local chefs, her farm share customers and at local farmers markets through her business, One Black Sheep, LLC. She designs gardens that integrate annual and perennial plants, vegetables, fruits, flowers and herbs through her design business, “Gardens of Use & Delight”.


    This lecture is part of the Summer Lecture Series of the Tate House Museum. Light refreshments will be served and admission is $12 per person, $10 members. For reservations call 774-6177.

    Contact:

    Betty Janus

    Tate House Museum

    1267 Westbrook Street

    Portland ME 04102

    207-774-6177

    info@tatehouse.org





  • 29 Jun 2016 7:00 PM | Anonymous member

    The L.C.Bates Museum has a blue marlin caught by Ernest Hemingway and mounted by Maine taxidermist Fred C. Parke of Bangor. Scholar Susan Beegel will present a talk on Wednesday, June 29 about the marlin and its history and marine life in Hemingway's work Old Man and the Sea. The talk is free and prior to the talk you may visit the museum to see the recently preserved marlin. 

    The L.C.Bates Museum is located at 14 Easler Road (on route 201) in Hinckley, ME. For more information contact the museum at 207-238-4250 or at lcbates@gwh.org.

  • 28 Jun 2016 6:30 PM | Anonymous member

    The Tate House Museum presents Poetry in the Garden on the Tate House lawn by the Stroudwater River on Tuesday, June 28 from 6:30 - 8:00 PM.

    Seeing with the Heart's Ear is a presentation of poems from Martin Steingesser's new book, Yellow Horses, and a garden of poems by several other poets presented as an ensemble work in two voices by Martin, Portland’s first Poet Laureate, and performer Judy Tierney.

    Martin Steingesser's poems whisper, shout and occasionally slam. He is author of three books of poems, Yellow Horses; Brothers of Morning; and The Thinking Heart: the Life & Loves of Etty Hillesum, based on Hillesum’s writings, composed and arranged for performance. The Thinking Heart has toured in New England and in Europe, at the International Etty Hillesum Congress (2014). “His poems are ablaze with imagination,” said poet Laure-Anne Bosselaar. “A burning, tender voice,” declared former Maine Poet Laureate Baron Wormser.

    Judy Tierney is a performer and member of The Thinking Heart Ensemble that toured New England and Europe, a former radio show host, dancer and Taiji practitioner.

    This promises to be an unforgettable evening as Martin and Judy captivate the audience by bringing words to life with their engaging presentation.

    This event is part of the Tate House Museum Summer Lecture Series. The admission fee, which supports the museum and its programs, is $10 ($8 for museum members). Light refreshments will be served. For reservations please call 774-6177 or e-mail the museum at info@tatehouse.org.


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Maine Archives and Museums

P.O. Box 784, Portland, Maine 04104   207-400-6965       info@mainemuseums.org 

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