SUPPORTING AND PROMOTING
MAINE'S COLLECTING INSTITUTIONS

Events at Member Institutions

Umbrella Cover Museum, Peaks Island Curran Homestead and Living History Museum, Orrington Curran Homestead and Living History Museum, Orrington Hamilton House, South Berwick Union Historical Society 

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  • 22 Oct 2016 12:00 PM | Anonymous member

    The Tate House Museum is hosting cemetery tours of the 18th Century Stroudwater Burial Ground on Saturday October 15th and 22nd from 12-4 PM. Hear from the ghostly apparitions themselves as they talk about the joys and hardships of colonial life as they knew it. Gather up your friends and family and get ready for a tour that is a little bit spooky and a little bit educational. An afternoon of ghostly fun and entertainment awaits visitors. Come see the gravestone of George and Mary Tate which has recently been cleaned.

    Ticket prices are $12.00 for adults and $6.00 for children 12 and under. Tickets and a “Home Made Pie Sale” will be available in the gift shop, 1267 Westbrook Street, Portland, ME.

  • 19 Oct 2016 6:30 PM | Anonymous member

    A film in progress about the production, consumption, and history of racist collectibles

    by Chico Colvard


    6;30PM-10:00PM: Reception, film, and live webchat with the filmmaker.

    Wednesday, October 19th, 2016 at 

    SPACE Gallery - 538 Congress Street, Portland

    Free to the public, cash bar

    Street parking available

    Watch the trailer here. 

    For more information, contact susie.bock@maine.edu

  • 15 Oct 2016 12:00 PM | Anonymous member

    The Tate House Museum is hosting cemetery tours of the 18th Century Stroudwater Burial Ground on Saturday October 15th and 22nd from 12-4 PM. Hear from the ghostly apparitions themselves as they talk about the joys and hardships of colonial life as they knew it. Gather up your friends and family and get ready for a tour that is a little bit spooky and a little bit educational. An afternoon of ghostly fun and entertainment awaits visitors. Come see the gravestone of George and Mary Tate which has recently been cleaned.

    Ticket prices are $12.00 for adults and $6.00 for children 12 and under. Tickets and a “Home Made Pie Sale” will be available in the gift shop, 1267 Westbrook Street, Portland, ME.

  • 08 Sep 2016 2:55 PM | Anonymous member

    The story of Maine’s Historic Bridges is more faceted than you might think.  Why are bridges located where they are?  Who built them?  Why do they look the way they do?  Amanda Taylor, Architectural Historian, will provide a presentation based on the publication Historic Bridges of Maine: 350 Years of Bridge and Roadway Design.  She will discuss the unique ways in which Maine’s bridge builders overcame geography and environmental influences to provide travel throughout the state.  The talk also showcases several specific historic bridges in Maine and detail how their builders chose creative solutions to difficult crossings and how technology changed design and construction.

    Our speaker, Amanda Taylor, is an Architectural Historian for Kleinfelder, an international engineering and architecture firm with an office in Augusta.  In recent years, she has documented historic resources related to the Sarah Mildred Long Bridge in Kittery, Masse Saw and Grist Mill in Vassalboro, and Belfast and Moosehead Lake Railroad Freight House in Belfast.  She has spent much of the last four years completing historic resource surveys throughout Maine.

    The Kennebec Historical Society Annual Meeting Program is open to the public and will take place on Wednesday, September 28, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. at the Viles Arboretum, located at 153 Hospital Street in Augusta.​  The public program will be preceded at 5pm by a potluck supper and at 6pm by the society’s annual business meeting.  Any members that wish to attend the potluck supper are invited to bring a dish to share.  Please note that the Annual Meeting program is not the society’s monthly program.


  • 30 Aug 2016 11:10 AM | Anonymous member

    Cynthia Milliken Taylor will be speaking on the historic aspects of the Cony Flatiron Building, which was rededicated on July 28, 2015, the restoration efforts and the adaptive re-use for Senior living.  Cynthia has an Architectural Degree from the Rhode Island School of Design and 30 years of experience in redeveloping old and new buildings for Seniors in Maine and New Hampshire.  With an interest in improving the lives of many older people and an eye for quality design she has developed over 3500 apartments and completed the financing and renovations of numerous historic buildings including the Inn at City Hall and the Cony Flatiron in Augusta.  Taking a leadership role in creative financing, construction and community building, she has tried to benefit those who live within and those who value their neighborhoods and cities through economic development.  Please join us at Cony Flatiron for an historic presentation on the Old and the New Cony High School.

    The Kennebec Historical Society September Public Presentation is free to the public (donations gladly accepted) and will take place on Wednesday, September 21, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. at the Cony Flatiron Building, located at 110 Cony Street in Augusta.​  Please note this is our monthly program and is separate from the program which will be held at the KHS Annual Meeting.


  • 28 Aug 2016 2:55 PM | Anonymous member

    The Tate House Museum welcomes acclaimed food historian and cookbook author Sandy Oliver on Tuesday, September 13 from 6:30-8:00 PM for a presentation on the Early American kitchen and its importance to the Colonial household.

    The economy, health, and hospitality of the early American household depended largely upon the capabilities and energy of the woman or women who ran the operations centered in the kitchen. The old saw says, "Men work from sun to sun, but women's work is never done.” Cooking, preserving, gardening, and caring for small animals to raising children and keeping all the family clothed and healthy began and never ended in the kitchen.

    Sandy is a freelance food writer whose weekly column “Taste Buds” has been featured since 2006 in the Bangor Daily News, with regular columns also appearing in Maine Boats, Homes, and Harbors magazine and The Working Waterfront. She is a pioneering food historian, beginning her work in 1971 at Mystic Seaport Museum, where she developed a fireplace cooking program in an 1830s house. After moving to Maine in 1988, Sandy wrote Saltwater Foodways: New Englanders and Their Food, at Sea and Ashore, in the Nineteenth Century, published in 1995. She subsequently authored Food in Colonial and Federal America and co-authored, with Kathleen Curtin, Giving Thanks: Thanksgiving Recipes and History from Pilgrims to Pumpkin Pie. Her most recent book, Maine Home Cooking, published in 2012 by Down East Books, is available in the gift shop.She often speaks to historical organizations and food professional groups around the country, organizes historical dinners, and conducts classes and workshops in food history and in sustainable gardening and cooking. Sandy lives on Islesboro, an island in Penobscot Bay, where she gardens, preserves, cooks, and teaches sustainable lifeways.

    This event is part of the Tate House Museum Summer Lecture Series. The admission fee, which supports the museum and its programs, is $12 ($10 for museum members). Seating is limited to 25 as this program includes time in the Tate House kitchen, where space is limited. For reservations please call 774-6177 or e-mail the museum at info@tatehouse.org.


  • 19 Aug 2016 8:30 AM | Anonymous member

    Between 1944 and 1946, more than 4,000 German prisoners of war called Maine home. The story of how they arrived, and the lasting impact that they had on the people who encountered them is one of Maine’s most interesting and obscure stories.  Using materials and research used to create the 2012 exhibit “Maine Boys Overseas and German Boys in Maine,” Holocaust and Human Rights Center of Maine Program Director David Greenham shares the lively and surprising story of an interesting chapter of Maine history.  It is a story of cooperation, kindness, and enemies who became colleagues, and even friends. 

    David Greenham is an adjunct professor of Drama at the University of Maine at Augusta, works as a grant writer and Program Manager for the Holocaust and Human Rights Center of Maine (HHRC).  He spent 14 years as the Producing Artistic Director of The Theater At Monmouth, and has been a theater artist and arts administrator for more than 25 years.  In 2013, David was the creator and performer of Maine at Work, a touring program commissioned by the Maine Humanities Council. He has also been seen as a performer with Everyman Repertory Theater, Bath Shakespeare Festival, Camden Shakespeare Festival, and Capitol City Improv in Augusta.  In 2013, David created the exhibit Maine Boys Overseas, and German Boys in Maine for the HHRC.  The exhibit and the research to create it was the inspiration for the POW Camps in Maine program that has been presented for several community groups in Maine.  He continues to research the project with the goal of writing a book about the topic in partnership with several historians.

    The Kennebec Historical Society and the Maine State Library’s Public Presentation will take place on Wednesday, August 24, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. at the Maine State Library, 230 State Street in Augusta.  This is an encore presentation of the Kennebec Historical Society’s July Public Presentation and refreshments will be served.


  • 15 Aug 2016 9:04 AM | Anonymous member

    Florence Brooks Whitehouse was a Maine suffrage leader from 1914 – 1920. Her support of “radical” tactics, such as picketing President Wilson, earned condemnation from her more conservative suffrage peers in Maine.  As a result, she was left out of suffrage histories, although the record plainly shows that she did more than almost anyone in the closing years of the campaign to bring woman suffrage to the state. Through a statewide suffrage referendum, WWI, the 1918 influenza pandemic, and the political machinations of men of both major political parties, Florence and her peers fought for women’s right to vote and to have equality of opportunity with men. This is a story that has really never been told in Maine.

    Anne Gass, our August speaker and great-grand-daughter of Whitehouse, has written Voting Down the Rose: Florence Brooks Whitehouse and Maine’s Fight for Woman Suffrage, which is a lively account of Florence’s suffrage activities during the critical final years of the campaign.  Due to the wealth of correspondence, interviews, and other historical documents Gass found in her research, Florence is often able to speak for herself in the pages.  William Barry, who reviewed the book for the Portland Press Herald, wrote “The author, Whitehouse’s great-grand-daughter, is never sentimental, for this is a true work of scholarship. Gass depicts not only the work of one Maine suffragist, but also the clash between the Maine Woman Suffrage Association, founded in 1874, and the radical National Woman’s Party of 1916.”


    The Kennebec Historical Society August Presentation is free to the public (donations gladly accepted) and will take place on Wednesday, August 17, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. at the Augusta City Center, located at 16 Cony Street in Augusta.​  


  • 13 Aug 2016 10:00 AM | Anonymous member

    The Tate House Museum is honored to host the premier book signing for RonRomano’s upcoming release, “Early Gravestones in Southern Maine: The Genius of Bartlett Adams” on Saturday, August 13. In addition, Mr. Romano will be leading tours of the historic and picturesque Stroudwater Burying Ground, which contains gravestones that are the work of Bartlett Adams.

    The slate gravestones of southern Maine bear evidence to the region's fascinating history, from shipwrecks and famous wartime sea captains to countless ordinary citizens. Master stone-cutter Bartlett Adams memorialized the tragedy and triumph of the region in nearly 2,000 gravestones. The book examines the artistry of the headstones that mark the resting places of three generations of the same family who all went down with the schooner Charles, and reveals the grief that Adams poured into the stones for his own three children. Through deep and original research, author and guide Ron Romano narrates the early history of southern Maine and one man's legacy, carved in stone.


    A native of Portland, Ron Romano leads the cemetery walking tours program for Spirits Alive, the Friends of Eastern Cemetery. He is active in stone conservation and enjoys researching "subterranean residents" and gravestones. He has found 1,750 gravestones at 133 Maine cemeteries that were produced in the Bartlett Adams stone-cutting shop between 1800 and 1828. Ron has presented his original research on the life and work of Adams locally and nationally at a series of well-received lectures.


    Book signings and cemetery tour sessions will be conducted at 10:00AM, noon, and 2:00PM. The cost of the tour is $10, or FREE with the purchase of the book. Combination tours including the Tate House will also be available.


    For More Information Contact:

    Betty Janus

    Tate House Museum

    1267 Westbrook Street

    Portland, Maine

    207-774-6177

    www.tatehouse.org


  • 09 Aug 2016 6:30 PM | Anonymous member
      On August 9th at 6:30PM the Tate House Museum will be presenting a lecture and workshop with Beth Maitland on the art of English Paper Piecing. For those interested in quilting or fabric artistry this is a time-honored technique dating back to the first quarter of the 18th century. It’s a wonderfully simple method for constructing intricate quilts with lots of perfectly matched points. It’s completely done by hand and can be assembled in modular units so you can take it with you.

    Beth is a member of the Pine Tree Quilters Guild and an award winning teacher of quilting. Her series of workshops, lectures, and demonstrations aredesigned to focus on creativity and individual design. Her light-hearted and engaging approach allows quilters of all levels to actively utilize their innate creativity.

    This lecture is part of the Tate House Museum Summer Lecture Series. Reservations are suggested by calling 774-6177 or emailing info@tatehouse.org. Tickets are $12 ($10 for members).


    Contact:

    Betty Janus

    Tate House Museum

    1267 Westbrook Street

    Portland ME 04102

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Maine Archives and Museums

P.O. Box 784, Portland, Maine 04104   207-400-6965       info@mainemuseums.org 

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