SUPPORTING AND PROMOTING
MAINE'S COLLECTING INSTITUTIONS

Events at Member Institutions

Umbrella Cover Museum, Peaks Island Curran Homestead and Living History Museum, Orrington Curran Homestead and Living History Museum, Orrington Hamilton House, South Berwick Union Historical Society 

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  • 22 Feb 2017 6:30 PM | Anonymous member

    From 1676 and into the 18th century, much of Maine, including the Kennebec River region, was abandoned by the English due to a series of colonial Indian wars.  In 1713, the Treaty of Utrecht afforded a sufficient promise of peace for settlers to return to the frontier of Maine.  The lands along the Kennebec were owned by various groups of proprietors who wished to sell these lands to settlers.  To secure the frontier and more importantly make the settlers feel secure, a series of four forts were built along the Kennebec between 1720 and 1754.  This talk will discuss the history and archaeology of these forts.

    Leon (Lee) Cranmer, our speaker, is an historical archaeologist who retired in August 2010 from the staff of the Maine Historic Preservation Commission.  He has a BS from Stockton University, and a BA in Anthropology and MA in history/historical archaeology from the University of Maine.  Lee has worked in archaeology in Maine for almost 30 years and has conducted archaeology for the state of Maine for well over 20 years.  Prior to that he spent two seasons in England doing archaeology.  He has written one book and numerous articles on Maine historical archaeology and is currently working on another book on Fort Halifax, a French and Indian War period fort in Winslow, Maine.  He has excavated hundreds of Maine sites for which he has written or co-authored site reports.  Prior to his archaeology career, Lee spent 7 years in the Navy and is a Vietnam veteran.  He lives in Somerville, Maine with his wife, Liz.

    The Kennebec Historical Society February Presentation is free to the public (donations gladly accepted) and will take place on Wednesday, February 22, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. at the Maine State Library, located at 230 State Street in Augusta. ​  


  • 22 Feb 2017 11:47 AM | Anonymous member

    Program in New England Studies

    Boston - February 2017

    Historic New England presents the Program in New England Studies, an intensive week-long learning experience, with lectures by specialists in history, architecture, preservation, and decorative arts; workshops; and specialized tours of Historic New England properties, other museums, and private houses.

    Learn about New England culture through artifacts and architecture in a way that no other museum in the Northeast can match. This program is perfect for museum professionals, graduate students, owners of historic houses, collectors, and anyone with a passion for New England history.

    New this year: Visits to the Eustis Estate, opening for the first time in 2017, and the newly restored Quincy House. Download a full schedule.

    Monday, June 19 - Saturday, June 24, 2017

    $1,550 Historic New England members

    $1,600 nonmembers

    Registration is required. Please call 617-994-6629 or register online.

    Scholarships available for Program in New England Studies

    Historic New England and a group of generous donors are providing multiple scholarships for Program in New England Studies. The scholarships are available to mid-career museum professionals and graduate students in the fields of architecture, decorative arts, material culture, or public history. Candidates from diverse cultural backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

    Program in New England Studies is an intensive week-long exploration of New England decorative arts and architecture that runs from Monday, June 19 to Saturday, June 24, 2017. Participants travel throughout New England to hear lectures and presentations by some of the country’s leading experts in regional history, architecture, preservation, and decorative arts. There are workshops, visits to Historic New England properties, other museums, and private homes and collections.

    Scholarship Applications

    Historic New England offers a specific scholarship to encourage the participation of individuals from diverse backgrounds. Applicants must represent a racial or ethnic minority group in the U.S. including but not limited to American Indian or African American or Black, Hispanic or Latino/a, Asian, or Pacific Islander.

    Scholarships cover the full registration fee, housing at a local university, and a travel stipend of $200. Applications should include: a resume or curriculum vitae (limit five pages) and a statement (limit two pages) explaining why you’d like to attend Program in New England Studies and how you expect the program to benefit you and your career and the impact that your presence might have upon other participants.

    Submission Deadlines: The deadline for the 2017 award is Friday, April 21. Applications must be submitted electronically by 4:30 p.m. Eastern on April 21 to Kturino@historicnewengland.org. Subject line should include “Historic New England Diversity Scholarship Proposal.” Successful applicants will be contacted by April 28, 2017

    Historic New England extends its thanks to Ralph Bloom, Decorative Arts Trust, and Tom and Alice Gould for making these scholarships available.

    Click Here for more information.



  • 09 Feb 2017 6:00 PM | Anonymous member

    The Holocaust and Human Rights Center of Maine [HHRC] will host its 3rd Annual Hearts for Human Rights Fundraiser on Thursday, February 9th at 6 p.m. at the Brunswick Hotel & Tavern.

    The evening will feature live music by Portland, Maine's Pihcintu Multicultural Chorus, a live and silent auction, heavy hors d'oeuvres and more.

    Each year, the HHRC reaches as many as 4,000 teachers and students from all over the state with free outreach programs about civil rights, the Holocaust, and civil discourse. All proceeds from the Hearts for Human Rights fundraiser will support the HHRC’s educational programming.

    This year the HHRC will be joined by Pihcintu, a multicultural chorus that brings young, immigrant and refugee voices together to sing as one and inspire cultural acceptance. The group has shared its message of unity and peace by performing throughout Maine and at the United Nations in New York City.

    Tickets are $40 per person and $300 for a table of 8. RSVP by Friday, January 27th to Jordan Bannister at jordan.bannister@maine.edu or by calling (207) 621-3530.

    Event sponsorship opportunities are also available. For more information, email infohhrc@maine.edu.

  • 27 Dec 2016 9:26 AM | Anonymous member

    Did you ever wonder about the history of your house?  When was it built and by whom?  Did George Washington or Abraham Lincoln sleep there?  We will discuss how to utilize existing land and other records to reconstruct the past of your house and learn about past occupants.  Included will be an overview of the registry of deeds and other sources, strategies for identifying and extracting pertinent information and tips for dealing with “stone walls” and other problems.

    Our speaker, Richard Bridges, is a Maine native and a graduate of the University of Maine and the Catholic University of America Columbus School of Law.  He has been a practicing attorney since 1983, concentrating on real estate and probate law.  He also serves as an Adjacent Instructor at Central Maine Community College and as a research consultant for the Augusta Historic Preservation Commission.

    The Kennebec Historical Society January Presentation is free to the public (donations gladly accepted) and will take place on Wednesday, January 18, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. at the Lithgow Public Library, Community Meeting Room, located at 45 Winthrop Street in Augusta. ​  



  • 23 Dec 2016 12:26 PM | Anonymous member

    The Polar Express™ returns for another season of magical memories at the Maine Narrow Gauge Railroad!  The fun begins at the Ocean Gateway Visitor Center, which serves as our train depot for this event. Holiday decorations inside the train add to the festive atmosphere as guests on board meet the Conductor, enjoy hot chocolate and cookies served by hot chocolate chefs, and listen to a reading of the story as they journey to the “North Pole.” Santa greets children aboard the train while passengers sing along to carols as they travel back to the train station. All tickets for this event are sold through PortTIX (www.porttix.com).  Early reservations are strongly encouraged as tickets often sell out.   

    The Polar Express™ is the largest annual fundraiser for the museum – thank you for your support! 

  • 14 Dec 2016 6:30 PM | Anonymous member

    Most of our birds are migratory. They come and go and you must be on the alert to see them at the right time and place.  Most of our flowers have only a brief blooming period.  You must look for them at a certain time of year if you wish to find them in all their beauty and fragrance.  But the trees we always have with us.  With them there is no hurry. They stand there summer and winter, year in and out, in all kinds of weather.  Many have been standing for more than a century.  This presentation is to introduce them and rouse the observer’s interest to the large, breathtaking trees around us.  We are fortunate to have two “National Champions”, the largest of a particular species in all the United States.  Maine has more than 160 different kinds of trees.

    If you look at a group of 100 trees in a small area, you will see at least 10 different species.

    Our presenter, Duane Prugh, graduated from the University of New Hampshire with a degree in Electrical Engineering.  He is now a semi-retired computer consultant.  For the past 15 years, he has been teaching at several of Maine’s Senior Colleges, taking local seniors on field trips to explore dozens of these sites.  There is so much to see in our own state, and his goal is to get our senior students out of their homes for day trips to explore sites in Maine that most people don’t know exist.  

    The Kennebec Historical Society December Presentation is free to the public (donations gladly accepted) and will take place on Wednesday, December 14, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. at the Augusta City Center, located at 16 Cony Street in Augusta. ​  


  • 11 Dec 2016 12:00 PM | Anonymous member

    Tate House Museum Hosts A Colonial Christmas

    Portland, Maine – Stroudwater’s historic Tate House Museum is hosting a Colonial Christmas Open House on Saturday, December 10 and Sunday, December 11, from noon until 4:00 pm. Come and see how an affluent mast agent’s family may have celebrated the holidays in the 18th century.

    Docents donned in period attire will greet visitors as they make their way from room to room in the 1755 home of Captain George Tate and his wife Mary. They will explain the prevailing traditions and customs of the time, including: Why did the Tates celebrate Christmas while many of their neighbors did not? How did decorations differ from those of today? What types of food and drink would be served? What kind of games and gifts might the children have enjoyed? What types of leisure activities did the adults pursue during the winter months? What is the meaning of Boxing Day? And be prepared to be delighted by a very special surprise or two along the way, as well.

    Delectable sweet and savoury treats will also be served across the street at the Means House. So please join us for the sights, sounds, and tastes of a Colonial Christmas at the only pre-Revolutionary home in Greater Portland open to the public. Admission is $15 for adults and $10 for children under 12.

    For more information contact:

    Betty Janus

    Tate House Museum

    1267 Westbrook Street

    Portland, ME 04012

    774-6177

    info@tatehouse.org

    www.tatehouse.org




  • 10 Dec 2016 12:00 PM | Anonymous member
    Tate House Museum Hosts A Colonial Christmas

    Portland, Maine – Stroudwater’s historic Tate House Museum is hosting a Colonial Christmas Open House on Saturday, December 10 and Sunday, December 11, from noon until 4:00 pm. Come and see how an affluent mast agent’s family may have celebrated the holidays in the 18th century.

    Docents donned in period attire will greet visitors as they make their way from room to room in the 1755 home of Captain George Tate and his wife Mary. They will explain the prevailing traditions and customs of the time, including: Why did the Tates celebrate Christmas while many of their neighbors did not? How did decorations differ from those of today? What types of food and drink would be served? What kind of games and gifts might the children have enjoyed? What types of leisure activities did the adults pursue during the winter months? What is the meaning of Boxing Day? And be prepared to be delighted by a very special surprise or two along the way, as well.

    Delectable sweet and savoury treats will also be served across the street at the Means House. So please join us for the sights, sounds, and tastes of a Colonial Christmas at the only pre-Revolutionary home in Greater Portland open to the public. Admission is $15 for adults and $10 for children under 12.

    For more information contact:

    Betty Janus

    Tate House Museum

    1267 Westbrook Street

    Portland, ME 04012

    774-6177

    info@tatehouse.org

    www.tatehouse.org




  • 30 Oct 2016 12:18 PM | Anonymous member

    Autumn is a beautiful time of year along the coast of Maine! Enjoy the beauty of the season with a ride aboard the Pumpkin Train at the Maine Narrow Gauge Railroad Co. & Museum.  The Pumpkin Train takes place October 22nd & 23rd and October 29th & 30th.  Children can explore the museum and paint a miniature pumpkin to bring home as a souvenir of the day. All visitors are treated to complimentary hot cider and cookies. Regular Admission Fees Apply.  The museum is open from 9:30am to 4:00pm with trains on the hour.

  • 22 Oct 2016 2:00 PM | Anonymous member

    Think America's current political situation is someone else's fault?

    Think Again!

    On Saturday, October 22nd at 7 pm and Sunday, October 23rd at 2 pm, the Holocaust and Human Rights Center of Maine's program director David Greenham will present a compelling new monologue, written by Mike Daisey, called "The Trump Card" at the Michael Klahr Center.

    The show tells the story of Donald Trump's rise from businessman to presidential candidate.

    Click Here to get your tickets today!

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